Past Events

View past seminars and other events sponsored by the department of Economics. Events can be viewed by date or filtered by seminar series. 

Additionally, view the drop down menu on the left.

Date & TimeSeminar SeriesSpeaker and Title
February 17, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsJesus Villaverde (University of Pennsylvania): "Financial Frictions and the Wealth Distribution"
February 14, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarMichele Rosenberg (Northwestern University): "Local Institutions and Industrial Development: The Political Economy of the Industrial Revolution"
February 12, 20202:00 PM - 3:00 PMTeaching Track Junior Recruitment Seminar/LecturePaola Boel- Junior Recruitment Candidate
February 12, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch SeminarErika Deserrano (Northwestern University): "Aid Crowd-Out: The Effect of NGOs on Government-Provided Public Services" (joint work with Nancy Qian)
February 11, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics LunchFrancesca Truffa (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
February 10, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsNuno Palma (University of Manchester): "The Vagaries of the Sea: Evidence on the Real Effects of Money from Maritime Disasters in the Spanish Empire"
February 7, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarYutaro Izumi​ (Northwestern University): "Agrarian Contract and Peasant Protest: Evidence from Colonial Korea"
February 6, 20204:00 PM - 5:00 PMTransportation Center SeminarMarlon Boarnet (University of Southern California): "Gentrification and Displacement Near Los Angeles Rail Transit Stations: New Evidence from Micro-Data"
February 6, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryNuno Palma (University of Manchester): "Comparative European Institutions and the Little Divergence, 1385-1800"
February 6, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarKristina Manysheva (Northwestern University): “Policy Distortions and Resource Allocation in Developing Countries: Macroprospective”
February 5, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch SeminarHossein Alidaee (Northwestern University): "Recovering Network Structure from Aggregated Relational Data using Penalized Regression" (Joint work with Eric Auerbach and Michael Leung)
February 5, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMPAS L+L: Ashley Wong & Francesca Truffa - Effect of Beliefs and Gender Roles on Girls' Math EducationJoin the Program of African Studies as we provide lunch and a lecture. Ashley Wong & Francesca Truffa, Northwestern University Effect of Beliefs and Gender Roles on Girls' Math Education Abstract: In Ghana, a large gender gap in participation exists across fields of study in senior secondary school; in home economics, 89.6% of students are girls while in general science, only 34% are girls (Ministry of Education, 2013). Recent literature suggests that schooling choices of girls are particularly influenced by societal beliefs about their math ability, labor market opportunities, and the role of women in the society (Agbley, 2015; Ajayi and Buessing, 2015). If parents’ and girls’ beliefs result from a lack of information, then providing information about potential math abilities and returns to math education in terms of labor market and family outcomes may increase investments in girls’ math education. We conduct an RCT in Ghana to investigate how providing these different types of information affect parents’ and children’s investments in math education in terms of time, schooling expenditures, girls’ aspirations, secondary school enrollment rate, and the field of study.  Bios: Ashley Wong is a fourth-year PhD student in Economics. Her research interests are in development, labor and gender economics. She graduated from Dartmouth College in 2014. Prior to coming to Northwestern, she worked as a research assistant at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.   Francesca Truffa is a fourth-year PhD student in Economics. Her research interests are in labor, development, and gender economics. She graduated with a Research Masters in Economics from Universie' Catholique de Louvain. Prior to coming to Northwestern, she worked as teacher and research assistant at Louvain.
February 4, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics LunchBrendon Andrews (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
February 4, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMTeaching Track Junior Recruitment Seminar/LectureChristopher Surro- Junior Recruitment Candidate
February 3, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsRudi Bachmann (University of Notre Dame): "Uncertainty and Change: Survey Evidence of Firms’ Subjective Beliefs"
January 31, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarFrançois R. Velde (Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago): "Monetary crisis and reform in 17th c. Naples"
January 30, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarSantiago Camara (Northwestern University): "Sudden Stop Crises and Export Dynamics: Evidence and Theory"
January 29, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch SeminarMichele Ugo Rosenberg (Northwestern University): "Technological Change, Organizational Capacity and Conflict: Land Occupations in Brazil"
January 28, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics LunchJoe Long (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
January 28, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMTeaching Track Junior Recruitment Seminar/LectureTsu-ting (Tim) Lin- Junior Recruitment Candidate
January 27, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMMatthias Doepke (Economics) - Economics of Parenting with Neighborhood and Peer Effects"It Takes a Village: The Economics of Parenting with Neighborhood and Peer Effects" by Matthias Doepke, Professor of Economics and IPR Associate This event is part of the 2020 Fay Lomax Cook IPR Colloquium Series.
January 27, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsNitzan Tzur-Ilan (Northwestern University): "Unintended Consequences of LTV Limits on Credit and Housing Choices"
January 24, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarMatti Mutten (University of Chicago): "Title TBD"
January 23, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarCassiano Alves (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
January 23, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics LunchMaddelena Ronchi (Queen Mary University of London): "Managers' Gender Attitudes and the Gender Gap"
January 17, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarQuoc-Anh Do (Sciences Po): "J’Accuse... Antisemitism, Financial Markets, and Rents from Discrimination" 
January 16, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarFabio Blasutto (Northwestern University): "Unilateral Divorce and the rise of Cohabitation"
January 16, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMTeaching Track Junior Recruitment Seminar/LectureJoseph Hardwick- Junior Recruitment Candidate
January 15, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics LunchEilidh Geddes (Northwestern University): "Public Health Insurance Expansion and Spillovers to Privately Insured Patients"
January 14, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMTeaching Track Junior Recruitment Seminar/LectureRachel Sederberg- Junior Recruitment Candidate
January 13, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMMolly Schnell (IPR/Economics) - Impacts of Physician Payments on Patient Access, Use, and Health"The Impacts of Physician Payments on Patient Access, Use, and Health" by Molly Schnell, Assistant Professor of Economics and IPR Fellow This event is part of the 2020 Fay Lomax Cook IPR Colloquium Series.
January 13, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsWojciech Olszewski (Northwestern University): "Efficient Dynamic Allocations in Endowment Economies with Private Information"
January 9, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Sena Coskun (Mannheim University): "Title TBD"
January 8, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics LunchNitzan Tzur-Ilan (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
January 6, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsChristina Patterson (Northwestern University): "The Matching Multiplier and the Amplification of Recessions"
December 13, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Michael Porcellacchia (Northwestern University): TBA
December 12, 20193:00 PM - 4:30 PMSeminar in Applied Microeconomics David Chan (Stanford University): "Selection with Variation in Diagnostic Skill: Evidence from Radiologists"
December 12, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Brittany Almquist Lewis (Northwestern University) 
December 10, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Shakeeb Kahn  (Boston College): "Identification of Dynamic Panel Binary Response Models"    
December 6, 201912:30 PM - 2:00 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Marco Tabellini (Harvard Business School): "Racial Discrimination and the Social Contract: Black WWII Volunteer Enlistment​"
December 5, 20193:00 PM - 4:30 PMSeminar in Applied MicroeconomicsEmilia Tjernström (University of Wisconsin): "Media and Motivation: The Effect of Performance Pay on Writers and Content"
December 5, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Ana Daniel (Northwestern University): "Demand Driven Labor Market Polarization" 
December 5, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Laia Navarro-Sola (Northwestern University): Title TBA
December 4, 201912:00 PM - 1:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch SeminarRichard Peck (Northwestern): "Title TBD"
December 4, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarEmre Enes Yavuz (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
December 3, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Kevin Song (University of British Columbia): "Measuring Diffusion over a Large Network" with Xiaoqi He  
December 2, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Eugenio Miravete (University of Texas):  “Welfare Consequences of Nominal Excise Taxation”
December 2, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsDirk Krueger (University of Pennsylvania): “Should Germany Build a New Wall? Macroeconomic Lessons from the 2015-20? Refugee Wave”
December 2, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarKensuke Maeba (Northwestern University): "The Design of Antipoverty Policies Based on School Dropout and Household Welfare"
November 27, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarFrederico Puglisi (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
November 26, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Alexandre Poirier (Georgetown University): "Sensitivity Analysis in Linear Models" (joint with Matthew Masten)    
November 25, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Tom Holmes (University of Minnesota): "Indivisibilities in Distribution"
November 25, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsFatih Guvenen (University of Minnesota): "Use It or Lose It: Efficiency Gains from Wealth Taxation"
November 25, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarYong Cai (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
November 22, 20192:00 PM - 3:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMaria Fernando Petri Betto (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
November 22, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Francesca Truffa (Northwestern University): "Gender Diversity and Scientific Research"
November 22, 201912:00 PM - 2:00 PMFeed Your Mind Lunch SeriesProfessor Mar Reguant (Northwestern University) RSVP here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1RTEaGso5VYZ6iirNMzVxB-Xk4x8TiYKAfvB93bhskEA/edit  
November 22, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMIndustrial Organization Graduate Student SeminarDmitry Sedov (Northwestern University): "Spatial externalities, product availability and prices"
November 21, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Egor Kozlov (Northwestern University) 
November 21, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Brendon Andrews (Northwestern University): Title TBA
November 20, 20196:00 PM - 7:30 PMAn Evening with Matthias Doepke Join us for a conversation with Economics Professor: Matthias Doepke, author of:  Love, Money, & Parenting: How Economics Explains the Way We Raise Our Kids Light appetizers and refreshments will be served.    *Please note this event is only for NU Economics alumni.
November 20, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarJingxiong Hu (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
November 19, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics José Luis Montiel Olea (Columbia University): "A Robust Machine Learning Algorithm for Text Analysis" and "(Machine) Learning Parameter Regions"    
November 18, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Giulia Brancaccio (Cornell University): "Efficiency in Decentralized Transport Markets"   ABSTRACT: In this paper we explore efficiency and optimal policy in decentralized transportation markets, such as taxicabs, trucks and bulk shipping. We focus on the role of search frictions, which are common in these markets. We explore how search frictions distort equilibrium allocations away from efficient outcomes, and provide analytical results for the conditions required to restore efficiency. These conditions naturally translate to a set of origin-destination efficient prices that can inform optimal policy. We then use our theoretical results to explore welfare loss and policy in the dry bulk shipping sector. We find evidence of inefficiencies that reduce international trade.
November 18, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Silvana Tenreyro (London School of Economics): “Monetary Policy for Commodity Booms and Busts”
November 18, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarValentyn Litvin (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
November 15, 20193:00 PM - 4:00 PMIndustrial Organization Graduate Student SeminarEilidh Geddes (Northwestern University): "Insurer Competition and Rating Areas on the ACA Exchanges."
November 15, 20192:00 PM - 3:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarDeborah Kim (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
November 15, 201912:30 PM - 2:00 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Brendon Andrews (Northwestern University): "Physician Supply and Mortality: Evidence from a Shocking"
November 14, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic History Effie Benmelech (Northwestern University): "The Decline of Secured Debt"
November 14, 20193:00 PM - 4:30 PMSeminar in Applied MicroeconomicsJaya Wen (Northwestern University - Postdoctoral Fellow): "The Political Economy of State Employment and Instability in China"
November 14, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Jane Olmstead-Rumsey (Northwestern University) 
November 14, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Aaron Kirkman (Northwestern University): Title TBA
November 13, 201912:00 PM - 1:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch SeminarLeia Navarro-Sola (Northwestern): "Title TBD"
November 13, 201912:00 PM - 1:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch SeminarJoris Mueller (Northwestern):  "China's Official Overseas Finance and the Role of its Firms"
November 13, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMShort CourseDavid Kreps (Stanford University and Nemmers Prize Holder): "From Discrete- to Continuous-Time Models in Economics, and Back Again" Lecture 6 of 6
November 12, 20197:30 PM - 9:00 PMTransportation Center - Leon N. Moses LectureDaniel McFadden (University of California, Berkeley): "Attend, Consider, Decide: What Planners and Machines must Learn to Predict Travel Behavior"
November 12, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics EunYi Chung (University of Illinois): "Permutation Test for Heterogeneous Treatment Effects"    
November 11, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Cailin Slattery (Columbia University): "Bidding for Firms: Subsidy Competition in the U.S."
November 11, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Yueran Ma (University of Chicago): "Anatomy of Corporate Borrowing Constraints"
November 11, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMShort CourseDavid Kreps (Stanford University and Nemmers Prize Holder): "From Discrete- to Continuous-Time Models in Economics, and Back Again" Lecture 5 of 6
November 11, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMegumi Murakami (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
November 8, 20192:00 PM - 3:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarChristopher Heard (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
November 8, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Yutaro Yzumi (Northwestern University): TBA
November 8, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryYutaro Izumi (Northwestern University): "Rebellion and Education under Colonialism: Evidence from Colonial Korea"
November 7, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic History Trevon Logan (University of California, Santa Barbara): "The Green Books and the Geography of Segregation in Public Accommodations"
November 7, 20193:00 PM - 4:30 PMSeminar in Applied MicroeconomicsEva Vivalt (Australian National University ): "How Do Policymakers Update Their Beliefs?"
November 7, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Bence Bardoczy (Northwestern University): "Job Polarization and the Business Cycle"
November 7, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Ashley Wong and Francesca Truffa (Northwestern University): “Peer Effects in Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from MBA Students."   About: Using random assignment of MBA students to sections at a top 10 business school, we explore the role of female peers on the career choices of other females in section. We study whether having more female section peers can influence women to enter high-paid industries and positions. We find that female share has a positive differential effect on the probability to enter the finance industry for female students and that this result is driven by the share of women that work in high wage industries prior to attending the MBA program. Moreover, having a higher share of women in a section leads women to be 7% more likely to be in a management position after 10 years from graduation. The results of this study have important policy implications for universities and educators to address the gender gap in high-paid industries and occupations.
November 6, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMShort CourseDavid Kreps (Stanford University and Nemmers Prize Holder): "From Discrete- to Continuous-Time Models in Economics, and Back Again" Lecture 4 of 6
November 6, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarPaul Kim (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
November 4, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial OrganizationGiovanni Compiani (HAAS School of Business, University of California-Berkeley): "A Method to Estimate Discrete Choice Models that is Robust to Consumer Search"
November 4, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Kyle Herkenhoff (University of Minnesota): "Labor Market Power", Joint with David Berger and Simon Mongey. 
November 4, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMShort CourseDavid Kreps (Stanford University and Nemmers Prize Holder): "From Discrete- to Continuous-Time Models in Economics, and Back Again" Lecture 3 of 6
November 4, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMario Cannella (Northwestern University):  “Vote for Hollywood: US Undirected Soft Propaganda and Italian Elections”
November 1, 20192:00 PM - 3:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarEilidh Geddes (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
November 1, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar John Clegg (University of Chicago): "The Real Wages of Whiteness: Non-Slaveowners in the Slave South"
October 31, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic History Michele Rosenberg  (Northwestern University): "Shaping Ideology and Institutions: Economic Incentives and Slavery in the US South"
October 31, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Ana Danieli  (Northwestern University): "Uber as Unemployment Insurance"
October 31, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Eilidh Geddes (Northwestern University): Title TBA
October 30, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMShort CourseDavid Kreps (Stanford University and Nemmers Prize Holder): "From Discrete- to Continuous-Time Models in Economics, and Back Again" Lecture 2 of 6
October 30, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarNicole Ozminkowski (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
October 29, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Max Farrell (University of Chicago, Booth): "Deep Neural Networks for Estimation and Inference: Application to Causal Effects and Other Semiparametric Estimands"  
October 28, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Carlos Noton (University of Chile): "Price Setting and Negotiation in the Supermarket Industry"
October 28, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Monika Piazzesi (Stanford University): "Money and Banking in a New Keynesian Model"
October 28, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMShort CourseDavid Kreps (Stanford University and Nemmers Prize Holder): "From Discrete- to Continuous-Time Models in Economics, and Back Again" Lecture 1 of 6
October 28, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarJoao Guerreiro (Northwestern University): "What is the Optimal Immigration Policy? Migration, Jobs and Welfare’ and it is joint work with Sergio Rebelo and Pedro Teles"
October 25, 20192:00 PM - 3:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarAleksandra Paluszynska (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
October 25, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Michele Rosenberg (Northwestern University): "The Political Economy of the Industrial Revolution: local institutions and local industrial development"
October 24, 20193:00 PM - 4:30 PMSeminar in Applied Microeconomics Pinchuan Ong (Northwestern University): "The effect of child support on labor supply: An estimate of the Frisch elasticity"
October 24, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Jose Carreno (Northwestern University) 
October 24, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Ashley Wong and Francesca Truffa (Northwestern University): Title TBA
October 23, 201912:00 PM - 1:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch SeminarNilesh Fernando (Notre Dame): "Regulation by Reputation? Quality Revelation of Labor Intermediaries in International Migration (joint work with Niharika Singh, Harvard U.)" Abstract: Abuse and contractual breach are commonplace features of international migrant labor. This may in part be due to asymmetries of information between local labor intermediaries, prospective migrants and foreign employers. This paper examines a government program in Sri Lanka that created reputational incentives for local labor intermediaries and then publicly revealed their quality. Using a difference-in-difference design with an eligibility cutoff, we find that the program announcement induced all eligible agencies, and especially low-quality ones, to invest in the rating criteria. Second, we find that eligible agencies experience more and higher quality foreign demand after the revelation of quality. A regression discontinuity design shows that otherwise similar agencies with higher ratings experienced higher foreign demand. We find that the program facilitated better matching between local agencies and foreign employers: reputable employers switch to using higher rated agencies, driving down future harassment complaint rates by migrants and improving the market outcomes of these agencies.
October 23, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarSiu Hong (Jimmy) Lee (Northwestern University): "Information Frictions and Strategic Behavior in Intergenerational Communication of School-taught Agricultural Knowledge: A Field Experiment in Liberia"
October 22, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Michael Leung (University of Southern California): "Causal Inference Under Approximate Neighborhood Interference"  Abstract: This paper studies causal inference in randomized experiments with network interference. The most common approach to modeling interference assumes that treatments assigned to alters only affect the ego's response through a low-dimensional exposure mapping. We instead study models satisfying a substantially weaker approximate neighborhood interference assumption that captures the intuition that treatments assigned to units far from the ego should have a small (but potentially nonzero) impact on the ego's response. We show that this assumption is satisfied in well-known models of social interactions, in contrast to the exposure mapping approach. When the data consists of a single large network, we prove that standard inverse probability weighted estimators can consistently estimate treatment and spillover effects and are asymptotically normal. Finally, we propose a new variance estimator.  
October 21, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Robert Clark (Queen's University): "Resolving Failed Banks: Uncertainty, Multiple bidding and Auction Design"
October 21, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Leonardo Melosi (Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago): “Bad Jobs and Low Inflation” 
October 21, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarEdu Campillo Betancourt (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"  
October 18, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Yiling Zhao (Northwestern University): TBA
October 17, 20194:45 PM - 6:15 PMSeminar in Econometrics Joseph Hardwick (Northwestern University):  “Specification Testing in Partially Identified Instrumental Variables Models”    
October 17, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic History Xavier Duran (Universidad de los Andes): "Why not using the wheel? Evidence from the Cambao wagon road in nineteenth Colombian Andes."
October 17, 20193:15 PM - 4:45 PMSeminar in Econometrics Ryan Lee (Northwestern University): "Identification and Estimation of Treatment Effects with Instrumental Variables under Data Combination."      
October 17, 20193:00 PM - 4:30 PMSeminar in Applied Microeconomics Bruno Barsanetti (Northwestern University): "How Does Capital Destruction Impact Economic Activity?"
October 17, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Sergio Armella Olazábal (Northwestern University) 
October 17, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Riccardo Marchingiglio (Northwestern University): "The Employment Effects of Gender-Specific Minimum Wage" 
October 16, 20194:00 PM - 5:00 PMOpen House for Undergraduate StudentsLearn more about the major with the goal of exposure to diversity of research within economics.
October 16, 201912:00 PM - 1:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch SeminarRicardo Dahis (Northwestern): "Title TBD"
October 16, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarSantiago Camara (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
October 15, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Tatiana Komarova (London School of Economics): “Testing nonparametric shape restrictions” (with Javier Hidalgo)    
October 14, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Matthew Leisten (Northwestern University): "Information and the Boundaries of the Firm"
October 14, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Sergio Rebelo (Northwestern University, Kellogg): "Markups Across Space and Time”
October 14, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarUdayan Vaidya (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
October 11, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Fabio Blasutto (Northwestern University): "Catholic Censorship and the Demise of Knowledge Production in Early Modern Italy"
October 10, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic History Martha Bailey (University of Michigan): "Prep School for Poor Kids': The Long-Run Impact of Head Start on Human Capital and Productivity.
October 10, 20193:00 PM - 4:30 PMSeminar in Applied Microeconomics Laia Navarro-Sola (Northwestern University): "Secondary School Expansion through Televised Lessons: The Labor Market Returns of the Mexican Telesecundaria" 
October 10, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Hugh Montag (Northwestern University): "Inflation Perceptions: A Tale of Two Biases"
October 10, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Pawel Janas (Northwestern University): Title TBA
October 8, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Jim Powell (University of California, Berkeley): "Kernel Estimation for Dyadic Data."  Abstract: In this forthcoming working paper we consider nonparametric estimation of density and conditional expectation functions for dyadic random variables, i.e., random variables defined for all pairs of individuals/nodes in a network of size N. These random variables are assumed to satisfy a “local dependence” property, specifically, that any random variables in the network that share one or two indices may be dependent (though random variables which do not have an index in common are assumed to be independent). Estimation of density functions for continuously-distributed random variables or regression functions for continuously-distributed regressors are proposed using straightforward application of the kernel estimation methods proposed by Rosenblatt and Parzen (for densities) or by Nadaraya and Watson (for regression functions). Estimation of their asymptotic variances is also straightforward using existing proposals for dyadic data. More unusual are the rates of convergence and asymptotic (normal) distributions for the estimators, which are shown to converge at the same rate as the (unconditional) sample mean, i.e., the square root of the number N of nodes, under standard assumptions on the kernel method. This differs from the results for nonparametric estimation of densities and regression functions for monadic data, which generally have a slower rate of convergence than the sample mean.  
October 7, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Victoria Marone (Northwestern University): "Should There be Vertical Choice in Health Insurance Markets?”
October 7, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Martin Beraja (Massachusetts Institute of Technology): "Technological Transitions with Skill Heterogeneity Across Generations"
October 7, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarBoli Xu (Northwestern University): "TBD"
October 5, 20198:30 AM - 2:00 PMNetwork Econometrics Juniors' Conference The network econometrics juniors conference is a two day conference on the topic of networks econometrics. The conference is open to students and faculty of all fields and is part of the conferences on econometrics funded by the Center for Econometrics at Northwestern University.
October 4, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Matteo Magnaricotte (Northwestern University): "Vote for Hollywood: The Historical Effects of US Soft Propaganda on Political Choices"
October 4, 20199:00 AM - 6:00 PMNetwork Econometrics Juniors' ConferenceThe network econometrics juniors conference is a two day conference on the topic of networks econometrics. The conference is open to students and faculty of all fields and is part of the conferences on econometrics funded by the Center for Econometrics at Northwestern University.
October 3, 20194:30 PM - 6:30 PM"On the Brink: A Story of History, Hope and Determination" film screening and discussion with Donald J. Jackson '65Join us for "On the Brink: A Story of History, Hope and Determination" film screening and discussion with Donald J. Jackson '65, founder of the Alliance of Business Leaders and Entrepreneurs and Kimberley Rudd '88, communications and non-profit management professional.  Moderated by Producer and Co-director; Jeffrey D. Shulman (WCAS ’01, KSM ’03, KSM ’06); Professor of Marketing at the University of Washington Foster School of Business. Co-Hosted by The Austin J. Waldron Student-Alumni Connections Program, the Department of Economics & the Undergraduate Economics Society (UES)  Please RSVP for event at the "More Info" link
October 3, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic History Ran Abramitzky (Stanford University): "Intergenerational Mobility of Immigrants in the US over Two Centuries"
October 3, 20193:00 PM - 4:30 PMSeminar in Applied Microeconomics Apoorv Gupta (Northwestern University, Kellogg): "Firm Heterogeneity, Demand for Quality and Prices in the Indian Manufacturing Sector"
October 3, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Giacomo Magistretti (Northwestern University): "Fiscal Sustainability in Aging Economies" 
October 3, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Haritz Garro (Northwestern University): "Political Networks and Legislative Effectiveness"
October 1, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Charles Manski (Northwestern University): "Predicting Kidney Transplant Outcomes with Partial Knowledge of HLA Mismatch"    
September 30, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Kei Kawai (University of California, Berkeley): "Using Bid Rotation and Incumbency Patterns to Detect Collusion", with Sylvain Chassang, Jun Nakabayashi and Juan Ortner.
September 30, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Yuriy Gorodnichenko (University of California, Berkeley): "Inflation Expectations and Firm Decisions: New Casual Evidence”
September 26, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic History Riccardo Marchingiglio (Northwestern University): "Prison labor and the labor market outcomes of ex-convicts"
September 26, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Fabio Blasutto  (Northwestern University) "Marriage vs Cohabitation: Mating Strategies by Education in the USA”
September 26, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Bruno Barsanetti (Northwestern University): "Capital Destruction and Regional Growth: Evidence from the 1975 Black Frost"
September 25, 20195:30 PM - 6:30 PMOrientation for Economics Graduate Students on the Job MarketDiscussion of procedures for graduate students entering the job market
September 24, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Elizabeth Ogburn (Johns Hopkins University): "Social Network Dependence, The Replication Crisis, and (In)valid Inference" Abstract: In the first part of this talk, I will show that social network structure can result in a new kind of structural confounding, confounding by network structure, potentially contributing to replication crises across the health and social sciences. Researchers in these fields frequently sample subjects from one or a small number of communities, schools, hospitals, etc., and while many of the limitations of such convenience samples are well-known, the issue of statistical dependence due to social network ties has not previously been addressed. A paradigmatic example of this is the Framingham Heart Study (FHS). Using a statistic that we adapted to measure network dependence, we test for network dependence and for possible confounding by network structure in several of the thousands of influential papers published using FHS data. Results suggest that some of the many decades of research on coronary heart disease, other health outcomes, and peer influence using FHS data may be biased (away from the null) and anticonservative due to unacknowledged network structure. But data with network dependence abounds, and in many settings researchers are explicitly interested in learning about social network dynamics. Therefore, there is high demand for methods for causal and statistical inference with social network data. In the second part of the talk, I will describe recent work on causal inference for observational data from a single social network, focusing on (1) new types of causal estimands that are of interest in social network settings, and (2) conditions under which central limit theorems hold and inference based on approximate normality is licensed.  
September 23, 201912:30 PM - 3:00 PMOrientation for Second Year Economics Graduate StudentsInformation on degree goals in years 2 and 3, and presentations on each field of study
September 23, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Jacques Crémer (Toulouse School of Economics): "Migration between platforms"
June 14, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Yiling Zhao (Northwestern University): "Framing and gendering: the case of Computer Science and others"
June 14, 201912:00 PM - 1:00 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Riccardo Marchingiglio (Northwestern University): "The Employment Effects of a Gender Specific Minimum Wage"
June 11, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Matteo Magnaricotte, joint with Jose Flor Toro (Northwestern University): "Entry, Access and Quality Provision in the Peruvian Higher Education Market"   Abstract: "While the rapid expansion of enrollment in higher education in Latin America has been seen positively, it has also been coupled with lowering quality indicators, among other problems. In an extreme reaction to these issues, the Peruvian government issued a moratorium on new colleges and new branches of existing ones in 2012, after a doubling in the number of suppliers in the preceding decade. We argue this offers a good setting to understand the effects of entry on welfare in the higher education industry, featuring asymmetric information and endogenous quality decisions of the providers. We present reduced form evidence as motivation for further exploration of the topic. Given the national scale of the measure, we will discuss estimating a structural model as next step."
June 10, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Christina Patterson (Northwestern University): Title TBA
June 7, 20191:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Melanie Xue (Northwestern University): "Poverty and Violence: Evidence from the Little Ice Age in China"
June 6, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryAriell Zimran (Vanderbilt University): "Like an Ink Blot on Paper: Testing the Diffusion Hypothesis of Mass Migration, Italy 1876-1920."  
June 6, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarBence Bardoczy (Northwestern University) "Using the Sequence-Space Jacobian to Solve and Estimate Heterogeneous-Agent Models"
June 5, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarHonn Tai Lam (Northwestern University): "Accreditation and For-profit Institutions in Higher Education"
June 4, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Eric Gautier (Toulouse School of Economics): "Square-root nuclear norm penalized estimator for panel data models with approximately low-rank unobserved heterogeneity"    
June 4, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Nicole Ozminkowski (Northwestern University): "Labor market consequences of whistleblowing in the health industry: Evidence from a natural field experiment" Abstract: White-collar crimes, nonviolent offenses committed in commercial situations, cost the United States more than $500 billion (2.5% of GDP) annually. Since white collar crimes are difficult to detect, law enforcement agencies often rely on insiders, called whistleblowers, to report malfeasance. However, these whistleblowers may face retaliation for reporting, either by their current or by prospective employers who are made aware of the applicant’s whistleblowing status. We propose a large scale resume-correspondence study to understand the career consequences of whistleblowing for those who report three types of whistleblowing in the health industry: malpractice, billing fraud, and sexual harassment. We will follow this with analysis to determine characteristics of markets and hospitals that correlate with treatment effects in an effort to gain insight on potential drivers of discrimination against whistleblowers.  
June 3, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Mark Bils (University of Rochester): "Who Are the Hand-to-Mouth?” joint with Mark Aguiar and Corina Boar 
May 30, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryNoemi Nocera (University of Chicago): "Marital Segregation and the Labor Market Outcomes of Immigrants"
May 30, 20193:00 PM - 4:30 PMSeminar in Applied Microeconomics Jessica Goldberg (University of Maryland): "Incentivized Peer Referrals for Tuberculosis Screening: Evidence from India" Abstract: Peer referrals are a common strategy for addressing asymmetric information in contexts such as the labor market. They could be especially valuable for increasing testing and detection of infectious diseases, where peers may have advantages over health workers in both identifying new patients and providing them credible information, but they are rare in that context. In an experiment with 3,176 patients at 122 tuberculosis (TB) treatment centers in India, we find peers are indeed more effective than health workers in bringing in new suspects for testing, and low-cost incentives of about $US 3 per referral considerably increase the probability that current patients make referrals that result in the testing of new symptomatics and the identification of new TB cases. Peer outreach identifies new TB cases at 25%-35% of the cost of outreach by health workers and can be a valuable tool in combating infectious disease.
May 30, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarJane Olmstead-Rumsey (Northwestern University): "Market Concentration and the Productivity Slowdown"  
May 29, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarJiachen Ma (Northwestern University): "To pass, or not to pass – that is the question"
May 28, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Lidia Kosenkava (University of Virginia): "Nonparametric inference in asymmetric first-price auctions with k-rationalizable beliefs"    
May 24, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Michael Porcellacchia (Northwestern University): "The Organization of Violence in Nondemocratic Societies"
May 23, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryHui Ren Tan (National University of Singapore): "A Different Land of Opportunity: The Geography of Intergenerational Mobility in the Early 20th-Century U.S."  
May 23, 20193:00 PM - 4:30 PMSeminar in Applied Microeconomics Chao Fu (University of Wisconsin): "Government Expenditure on the Public Education System" with Shoya Ishimaru and John Kennan
May 23, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarKohei Matsumura (Northwestern University): "Demographic transition and land prices"
May 22, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarJunyan Guan (Northwestern University): "Royalties and Firm Efforts: Evidence from North Dakota Oil Leasing and Drilling"
May 21, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Tim Armstrong (Yale University): "Sensitivity Analysis using Approximate Moment Condition Models"
May 21, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Joe Long May (Northwestern University): "Title TBA"
May 20, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Thomas Wollmann (University of Chicago, Booth School of Business): "How to Get Away With Merger: Stealth Consolidation and its Real Effects on US Healthcare."
May 20, 201912:00 PM - 1:00 PMInstitute for Policy Research Colloquium Charles Manski (Northwestern University): "Tuberculosis Diagnosis and Treatment Under Ambiguity”
May 20, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Andrea Eisfeldt (University of California, Los Angelos): "Human Capitalists” joint with Antonio Falato and Mindy Xiaolan
May 20, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarBenjamin Vatter (Northwestern University): "Information spillovers in the demand for healthcare"
May 19, 20198:30 AM - 12:15 PMEconomic History Conference “Putting the Pieces Together: Promise, Programs and Pitfalls in Linking Historical and Contemporary Records”
May 18, 20198:30 AM - 5:00 PMEconomic History Conference“Putting the Pieces Together: Promise, Programs and Pitfalls in Linking Historical and Contemporary Records”
May 17, 20192:00 PM - 3:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarFrancesca Truffa (Northwestern University): "Effect of Peers on MBAs' Career Outcomes"
May 17, 201912:00 PM - 6:00 PMEconomic History Conference“Putting the Pieces Together: Promise, Programs and Pitfalls in Linking Historical and Contemporary Records”
May 16, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryNicolas Ziebarth (Vanderbilt University): “Firm Networks in the Great Depression” with Erik Loualiche and Chris Vickers. 
May 16, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarSergio Armella (Northwestern University)
May 15, 201912:00 PM - 1:15 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch Seminar Sutanoko Roy  (University of Chicago): "Countervailing impact of incentivizing the talented poor in resource poor environment: Theory and evidence from a field experiment" Abstract:There is widespread interest in policies that improve the educational outcomes of disadvantaged students. Preferential policies, scholarships, and prizes, either by design or equivocally or unintendedly, can increase the incentive of targeted students to compete for rank in class. When targeted students are already intrinsically motivated to rank highly in class, any increase in incentives can decrease the motivation of non-eligible peers who are also competing for rank in class. In the presence of positive peer--effects, demotivating the non-targeted group reduces potentially beneficial spillovers and if this reduction is pronounced, then it may even reduce the learning outcomes of targeted incentivized students. We find evidence for this countervailing phenomenon in a field study of the impact of "Merit-cum-Means" intervention in India. The paper reports on the first large-scale randomized field experiment (more than 14,000 undergraduate students) involving legally-recognized minorities to examine the causal effects of providing rank based financial incentives to disadvantaged students on high stakes university test grades. When very poor students are given the opportunity to win prizes, the test scores of the both the eligible poor minority and the test scores of the relatively richer majority group fall. The paper also provides evidence of reduced cooperation among high ability peers when poor students are incentivized and the majority of the peers are excluded. We provide a theoretical framework to understand this phenomenon that extends the tournament model of McAfee-Fullerton~(1999) and utilises the approach of Eaton and Kortum~(2002), which implicitly assumes Cox proportional hazard for idiosyncratic shocks. The implication of model is that in resource poor environments where peer effects are likely large, policies that enhance in-class positive externalities may be more effective in achieving better learning outcomes for the poor than incentivizing the poor to work harder to achieve high rank in examinations.
May 15, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarCassiano Alves (Northwestern University): "Should the government take sides in couples quarrels?"
May 14, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Matteo Magnaricotte (Northwestern University): "Entry, Access, and Quality Provision in the Higher Education Market"
May 13, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Adam Kapor (Princeton University): "Housing Search Frictions: Evidence from Search Data and a Field Experiment"
May 13, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Jessie Handbury (University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School): "Income Growth and the Distributional Effects of Urban Spatial Sorting"
May 13, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMichael Porcellacchia (Northwestern University): "Constraining a ruler: who wins and who loses"
May 10, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Krzysztof Karbownik (Northwestern University): "Assimilation through Educational Indoctrination: Evidence from Prussia"
May 10, 20199:15 AM - 4:00 PMNemmers Prize in Economics: ConferenceNemmers Conference.  This is associated with the awarding of the Nemmers Prize in Economics to David Kreps.  Day 2 of 2.  Free registration required.
May 9, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryWilliam Collins (Vanderbilt University): "Immigrants’ Labor Market Assimilation, Early and Late in the Age of Mass Migration”
May 9, 20193:00 PM - 4:30 PMSeminar in Applied Microeconomics Natalie Bau (University of California, Los Angeles): "Negotiating a Better Future: How Interpersonal Skills Facilitate Inter-Generational Investment."  Abstract: Using a randomized controlled trial, we study whether a negotiation skills training can improve girls' educational outcomes in a low-income country. In so doing, we provide new evidence on the effects of increasing interpersonal skills during adolescence. We find negotiation training significantly improved educational outcomes over the next three years, and these effects did not fade out. To better understand mechanisms, we estimate the effects of two alternative treatments. Negotiation had much stronger effects than an informational treatment, which had no effect. An empowerment treatment had directionally positive but insignificant educational effects. Relative to the empowerment training, negotiation increased enrollment in higher quality schooling and had greater effects for high ability girls. These findings are consistent with a model where negotiation allows high ability girls on the margin of being enrolled in school to elicit greater educational investment by strategically cooperating with their parents, a mechanism supported by lab-in-field and midline survey evidence.    
May 9, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarRiccardo Bianchi Vimercati (Northwestern University)
May 9, 20199:00 AM - 5:30 PMNemmers Prize in Economics: ConferenceNemmers Conference.  This is associated with the awarding of the Nemmers Prize in Economics to David Kreps.  Day 1 of 2.  Free registration required.
May 8, 20197:00 PM - 8:00 PMExploring Opportunities in Econ & Business ResearchWant to explore research opportunities in Economics and business? Curious about the research projects undergraduate students are involved in? Come to Kresge 2420 on Wednesday (May 8th) at 7pm to learn from students who have previous research experience in economics and business. Explore the various research opportunities for undergraduate students in the Econ Department as either research assistant or independent researcher. Learn about how to prepare and get started in research. Your favorite boba tea will be provided for free at the panel! This event is cohosted by the Undergraduate Economics Society and the Office of Undergraduate Research. Should you have any question, please email northwestern.ues@gmail.com
May 8, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMNemmers Prize in Economics: LectureDavid Kreps (Stanford University): "Some Dimensions of Behavior with which Economics Should Contend" (reception to follow)
May 8, 201912:00 PM - 1:15 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch Seminar Renate Hartwig (University of Namur): "Unblurring the market for vision correction: A willingness to pay experiment in rural Burkina Faso" Abstract:We assess the willingness to pay (WTP) for eyeglasses of an adult population in rural Burkina Faso. We elicit the WTP using the Becker-DeGroot-Marschak (BDM) approach. We combine the BDM method with a layaway scheme and a video intervention to probe to what extent liquidity and information matter. Our results show that the willingness to pay for glasses is low, amounting to 20% of the current market price. The video intervention raises the WTP for corrective glasses by 16%. The layaway scheme does not affect the willingness to pay. We test for screening effects in the sub-sample of adults that received corrective glasses and find no evidence of screening in this subgroup.
May 8, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarAaron Kirkman (Northwestern University): "Hospital Cost Shifting and the Affordable Care Act."
May 7, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch  Ashley Wong / Francesca Truffa (Northwestern University): "Title TBA"
May 6, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Thomas Covert (University of Chicago, Booth School of Business): "Relinquishing Riches: Auctions vs Informal Negotiations in Texas Oil and Gas Leasing"
May 6, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Philipp Schnabl (New York University, Sloan): "Banking on Deposits: Maturity Transformation without Interest Rate Risk"
May 6, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarDavid Stillerman (Northwestern University): "Loan Guarantees and Incentives for Information Acquisition"
May 3, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Riccardo Marchingiglio (Northwestern University): "Prison labor and the labor market outcomes of ex-convicts."
May 2, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryTaisu Zhang (Yale University): “The Ideological Foundations of the Qing Fiscal State”
May 2, 20193:00 PM - 4:30 PMSeminar in Applied Microeconomics David Autor (Massachusetts Institute of Technology): "College Aid, College Completion, and the Marginal Cost of a College Degree: Evidence from a Randomized Trial."
May 2, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarGiacomo Magistretti (Northwestern University): "Fiscal Sustainability in Aging Democracies"
May 1, 20195:30 PM - 6:30 PMNancy L. Schwartz Memorial LectureStephen Morris (Princeton University): "Taking Incomplete Information Seriously: The Misunderstanding of John Harsanyi"  Reception prior to lecture at 4:30pm.
May 1, 201912:00 PM - 1:15 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch Seminar Bruno Barsanetti (Northwestern University): "Weather, Capital in Agriculture, and Labor Markets: Evidence from the 1975 Black Frost" Abstract: Perennial plants are a capital stock that is particularly vulnerable to extreme weather events like droughts, frosts, or floods. I study the 1975 frost that destroyed coffee trees in the Brazilian state of Paraná as a shock to agricultural capital. To identify the effects of the frost, I compare -for Paraná and for control states -the evolution of local economies with different pre-frost coffee tree densities. The frost resulted in a large and persistent displacement of farm workers. Local labor markets adjusted through out-migration. The long-run effects on farm employment can be associated with the decline of the coffee industry, for which agglomeration economies are a likely explanation.  
May 1, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMatteo Camboni (Northwestern University):" Sleeping on a Decision - a Wald Approach to Model Uncertainty"
April 30, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Demian Pouzo (University of California, Berkeley): "Some Large Sample Results for the Method of Regularized Estimators" joint with Michael Jansson
April 30, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics LunchPawel Janas (Northwestern University): "Local financing constraints of the Great Depression"
April 29, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Koichiro Ito (University of Chicago, Harris School of Public Policy): "Policy Design with Advantageous Selection: Experimental Evidence from Electricity Plan Choice (with Takanori Ida and Makoto Tanaka)."
April 29, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Dan Greenwald (Massachusetts Institute of Technology): "Firm Debt Covenants and the Macroeconomy: The Interest Coverage Channel"
April 29, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarRiccardo Bianchi Vimercati (Northwestern University): "Micro Assignment and Macro Elasticities: Theory and Applications"
April 26, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Jamie Mark Daubenspeck (Northwestern University): "Foreign Investment and Agricultural Mechanization in Colonial Egypt." 
April 25, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryStefania Marcassa (Université de Cergy-Pontoise): "Marriage Strategy Among the European Nobility"  
April 25, 20193:00 PM - 4:30 PMSeminar in Applied Microeconomics Dina Pomeranz (University of Zurich): "Can Audits Backfire?"
April 25, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarAna Danieli (Northwestern University): "Monetary Policy and Labor Income Inequality: the Expenditure Elasticity Channel"
April 24, 201912:00 PM - 1:15 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch Seminar Eduardo Campillo and Jose Flor Toro (Northwestern University): "Immigration, deportation, and resettlement: A research agenda in Haiti and the Dominican Republic" Abstract:In 2013, a ruling of the Constitutional Court of the Dominican Republic (DR) effectively threatened citizenship for around 668,000 Dominican-born, most of them Haitian-Dominicans—about 7% of the population. Three years later, close to 100,000 people had been deported to neighboring Haiti, a country ten times poorer. In this setting, we ask three questions. First, we ask how can developing economies most efficiently accommodate large inflows of what are effectively refugees. In particular, we plan to run a field experiment to see if the positive impacts of migrants in the receiving economies’ export industry documented in the literature can be leveraged to facilitate accommodation. Second, we are interested in the labor market effects of sudden changes in the composition of labor supply due to an unexpected loss of citizenship and deportations. Finally, we take a step back and ask why a State would implement such measures. We model the political economy of such decisions focusing on public-finance and electoral motives. We provide some supporting evidence for both rationales using cross-country data on immigration policies and public finance, and sub-national Dominican data on electoral outcomes as they relate to the localized enforcement of deportations.
April 24, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarRichard Peck (Northwestern University): "Industrial Policy, Productivity and Misallocation in Venezuela, 1976-1989"    
April 23, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Marcelo Moreira (Fundação Getúlio Vargas): "Optimal Invariant Tests in an Instrumental Variables Regression With Heteroskedastic and Autocorrelated Errors."
April 23, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMThe Center for Economic Theory - Student-Invited Yearly Seminar Faruk Gul (Princeton University):"Cognitive Limitations as Behavioral Biases:Menu Effects and the Status Quo Bias" (with Wolfgang Pesendorfer and Evgenii Safonov)      
April 23, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics LunchAndre Nickow (Northwestern University): "Mobilizing for Entitlement: A Randomized Evaluation of a Homestead Land Rights Initiative in Bihar, India" with Sanjay Kumar Abstract: Bihar state law guarantees each rural household the right to hold title over a plot of homestead land, yet many poor households lack title. This article studies a social accountability program that established, trained, and mobilized village-level community-based organizations to assist Scheduled Caste households in obtaining homestead title. The study employs a mixed methods design in which a survey-based field experiment estimates the impact of the program on outcomes of interest while analysis of data from qualitative fieldwork documents ground-level processes. We find that the program strongly increased perceived land security and access to government entitlements, moderately increased asset ownership and homestead satisfaction, and had a weak positive effect on food security. However, we do not find evidence for impacts on investment in dwellings or homestead-based livelihood activities. The qualitative analysis suggests that a key mechanism by which the program improved entitlement access was enabling target households to circumvent profit-seeking intermediaries. Results contribute to development studies research on social accountability, government service delivery, and land rights.  
April 22, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Paulo Somaini (Stanford Graduate School of Business): "An Empirical Framework for Sequential Assignment: The Allocation of Deceased Donor Kidneys"
April 22, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Thibaut Lamadon (University of Chicago): "How Much Should we Trust Estimates of Firm Effects and Worker Sorting?" (with S. Bonhomme, K, Holzheu, E, Manresa, M. Mogstad and B. Setzler)
April 22, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarModibo Camara (Northwestern University): "Online Persuasion"
April 19, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Giampaolo Lecce (Northwestern University): "The Economics and Politics of Government Aid”
April 19, 201911:45 AM - 1:30 PMLeveraging an Economics major for the career YOU want! Learn from, and be inspired by, the journeys of NU alumnae.Leveraging an Economics major for the career YOU want!Learn from, and be inspired by, the journeys of NU alumnae:Susan Bies PhD '72 Sonya Brown '94 Amelia Chen '10 Michelle Story-Stewart ’92 Moderated by: Associate Professor Lori Beaman ’99 Co-Hosted by: The Department of Economics, the Waldron Student-Alumni Connections Program, and the Undergraduate Economic Society (UES) Friday, April 19 | Noon-1:30 pm | KGH 1410 *FREE LUNCH served at 11:45 am  
April 18, 20194:00 PM - 5:00 PMThe Susan Bies Lecture on Economics and Public PolicyThomas Piketty (Paris School of Economics, School of Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences): "Rising Inequality and Globalization"
April 18, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarMatthias Rottner (European University Institute): "Uncertainty, Credit Booms and Bank Runs" 
April 18, 201911:00 AM - 12:15 PMSeminar in Applied Microeconomics Julia Cagé (Sciences Po Paris): "It Takes Money to Make MPs : New Evidence from 150 Years of British Campaign Spending" (with Edgard Dewitte)."
April 17, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMichael Gmeiner (Northwestern University): "Price Distortions in the New Orleans Slave Market, 1804-1862"
April 16, 20195:30 PM - 6:00 PMMeeting for Third Year Economics Graduate StudentsMandatory meeting.  Director of Graduate Studies will discuss important deadlines, degree requirements and funding availability, and will answer questions.
April 16, 20195:00 PM - 5:30 PMMeeting for Second Year Economics Graduate StudentsMandatory meeting.  Director of Graduate Studies will discuss important deadlines, degree requirements and funding availability, and will answer questions.
April 16, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Roger Koenker (University College London): "Nonparametric maximum likelihood methods for binary response models with random coefficients"
April 16, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Michal Zator (Northwestern University): "Digitization and Automation: Determinants and Effects of Firms’ Adoption Decisions”.
April 15, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Nicholas Ryan (Yale University): "Contract Enforcement and Productive Efficiency: Evidence from the Bidding and Renegotiation of Power Procurement Contracts in India”
April 15, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in Macroeconomics Lawrence Christiano (Northwestern University): "Discouraging Deviant Behavior in Monetary Economics"
April 15, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarAshley Wong (Northwestern University): "Occupations and Motherhood Penalty"
April 12, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Mintra Dwarkasing (Erasmus University Rotterdam): "Battles and mortgage lending"
April 11, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryMarianne Wanamaker (University of Tennessee):"Cohort Effects of Restrictive Abortion Legislation ---Evidence from 19th Century Law variation"
April 11, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarMike Honig (Northwestern University): "Credit Shocks, Monetary Flows, and Quantitative Tightening"
April 10, 201912:00 PM - 1:15 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch Seminar Clément Imbert (University of Warwick): "Migrants and Firms: Evidence from China" (with Marlon Seror, Yifan Zhang and Yanos Zylberberg) Abstract:This paper provides causal empirical evidence that rural-urban migration lowers urban firm productivity in developing countries. We use longitudinal data on Chinese manufacturing firms between 2001 and 2006, and exploit exogenous variation in rural-urban migration due to agricultural price shocks for identification. We find that following a migrant inflow, labor costs decline and employment grows. Within firm, labor productivity decreases sharply and remains low in the longer run. Within industry and location, it is low-productivity firms that grow the most, so that aggregate labor productivity falls even faster. Since migrants favor high-productivity destinations, migration strongly equalizes factor productivity across locations.  
April 10, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student Seminar Joris Mueller (Northwestern University): "State Planning and Development: Evidence from Villagization in Tanzania"  
April 9, 20195:00 PM - 6:00 PMOrientation for Economics Graduate Students on the Job MarketDiscussion of procedures for graduate students thinking about entering the job market next year
April 9, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Econometrics Gonzalo Vazquez-Bare (University of California, Santa Barbara): "Identification and Estimation of Spillover Effects in Randomized Experiments."
April 9, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMApplied Microeconomics Lunch Ricardo Dahis (Northwestern University): "Local Politics Under Centralized Enforcement"
April 8, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial Organization Daniel Waldinger (New York University): "Targeting In-Kind Transfers through Market Design: A Revealed Preference Analysis of Public Housing Allocation." 
April 8, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsGabriel Chodorow-Reich (Harvard University): "Cash and the Economy: Evidence from India's Demonetization."
April 8, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarKristina Manysheva (Northwestern University): "The Impacts of Mobile Money on Village Economies: a General Equilibrium Approach."
April 6, 20199:00 AM - 5:00 PMNorthwestern Economics Tournament (NET) Northwestern Economics Tournament (NET) is an annual event for high school students passionate about economics and its applications. It is put on by the Northwestern Economics Department and a team of undergraduates.
April 3, 201912:00 PM - 1:15 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch SeminarApoorv Gupta (Northwestern University): "Technology Adoption and Access to Credit Via Mobile Phones"  Abstract:We study the effect of mobile phone coverage on technology adoption and access to credit by Indian farmers. Our units of observation are 10 X 10 km cells for which we observe the evolution of mobile phone coverage, land use and agricultural inputs between 1997 and 2012. Our empirical strategy exploits variation in the construction of mobile-phone towers under a large government program aimed at increasing mobile coverage in rural areas. In particular, we compare cells covered by new towers with similar cells where new towers were proposed but eventually not realized. We find that areas receiving mobile phone coverage experience faster adoption of high-yielding varieties of seeds, and higher increase in access to credit by small farmers. To explore how mobile phones can reduce farmers' information gap on new technologies and facilitate access to credit we analyze the content of 1.4 million geo-localized calls to a major call center for agricultural advice.
April 3, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMatteo Magnaricotte (Northwestern University): "Local Specialization and Growth: The Italian Land Reform"
April 2, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in EconometricsBulat Gafarov (University of California, Davis): "Inference in high-dimensional set-identified affine models"
April 1, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial OrganizationMark Satterthwaite (Northwestern University, Kellogg): "Internal versus External Growth in Industries with Scale Economies: A Computational Model of Optimal Merger Policy.” with Ben Mermelstein, Volker Nocke and Michael Whinston
April 1, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsSilvia Miranda-Agrippino (The Bank of England): "When Creativity Strikes: News Shocks and Business Cycle Fluctuations''
April 1, 201911:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarBrendon Andrews (Northwestern University): "Medical Education Reform and the Gatekeepers of Medical Knowledge in Early Twentieth Century North America."
March 19, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in EconometricsEric Auerbach (Northwestern University): "Measuring Differences in Stochastic Network Structure.''
March 15, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarYutaro Izumi (Northwestern University): "Title TBA"
March 14, 20193:00 PM - 4:30 PMSeminar in Applied MicroeconomicsAndrew Newman (Boston University): "The Top-Ten Way to Integrate High Schools" 
March 13, 201912:00 PM - 1:15 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch SeminarYutaro Izumi (Northwestern University):"Title TBA"
March 8, 201912:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarMatteo Magnaricotte(Northwestern University): “Local Specialization and Growth: the Italian Land Reform” (joint with R. Bianchi-Vimercati).
March 7, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryYannay Spitzer (Hebrew University of Jerusalem): "Entrepreneurship and Communal Tax Liability: The Political Economy of the Early Modern Jewish-Polish Symbiosis"
March 7, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarEgor Kozlov (Northwestern University): "Kids First or Marriage First? Unplanned Pregnancies, Household Bargaining and Marriage Selection.”
March 6, 201912:00 PM - 1:15 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch SeminarSera Young (Northwestern - Anthropology & Global Health, IPR): "A cross-culturally equivalent measure of household water security: experiences in scale development and implementation from 30 sites worldwide"  
March 5, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in EconometricsJoel Horowitz (Northwestern University): "Non-Asymptotic Inference in Instrumental Variables Estimation"
February 28, 20194:30 PM - 6:00 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryRiccardo Marchingiglio (Northwestern University): "Idleness, skill decay, and labor market outcomes: the case of prison labor in the 1920-40 U.S."
February 28, 201912:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarJose Carreno (Northwestern University):  "Housing Booms and the US Productivity Puzzle"  
February 27, 201912:00 PM - 1:15 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch SeminarRicardo Dahis (Northwestern University): "The Political Consequences of Public Policy: Evidence from the Brazilian Amazon"      
February 26, 20193:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in EconometricsIvan Canay (Northwestern University): "Testing Continuity of a Density via g-order statistics in the Regression Discontinuity Design∗"
February 20, 201912:00 PM - 1:15 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch SeminarAndrea Tesei (Queen Mary University): "Liberation Technology: Mobile Phones and Political Mobilization in Africa" (with M. Manacorda) Abstract:Can digital information and communication technology (ICT) foster mass political mobilization? We use a novel geo-referenced dataset for the entire African continent between 1998 and 2012 on the coverage of mobile phone signal together with geo-referenced data from multiple sources on the occurrence of protests and on individual participation in protests to bring this argument to empirical scrutiny. We find that mobile phones are instrumental to mass mobilization but this only happens during economic downturns, when reasons for grievance emerge and the cost of participation falls. The results are in line with insights from a network model with imperfect information and strategic complementarities in protest occurrence. Mobile phones make individuals more responsive to both changes in economic conditions - a mechanism that we ascribe to enhanced information - and to their neighbors’ participation - a mechanism that we ascribe to enhanced coordination. Empirically both effects are at play, highlighting the channels through which digital ICT can alleviate the collective action problem.